Info Hub

Our Info Hub contains a wide range of information related to dyslexia

You can delve into the various sections outlined here.

About Dyslexia

What is Dyslexia? The Dyslexia Association of Ireland defines dyslexia as a specific learning difficulty affecting the acquisition of fluent and accurate reading and spelling skills. This occurs despite access to appropriate learning opportunities. Dyslexia is characterised by cognitive difficulties in (1) phonological processing, (2) working memory, and (3) speed of retrieval of information from...

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Additional Teaching Support

In September 2017 there were changes made to the way that additional teaching support for students with special educational needs (including dyslexia) was allocated. The roles of Learning Support Teacher and Resource Teacher were combined into the role of Special Education Teacher. Schools were allocated an overall formula-derived amount of funds from the Department based...

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Exam Accommodations

State Examinations The State Examinations Commission (SEC) is the body responsible for second level examinations in Ireland.  It is a non-departmental public body under the aegis of the Department of Education and Skills. They can be contacted as follows: Address: Cornamaddy, Athlone, Co. Westmeath. Telephone: 090 6442700 Email: sec_specialneeds@education.gov.ie Website: www.examinations.ie Accommodations for Students Reasonable...

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Learning Languages

Dyslexia occurs at the individual word level, with the result that language learning, and in particular achieving accuracy and fluency in reading and written language, is challenging. Dyslexia occurs across a continuum from mild to severe. Students at the mild end of the spectrum may manage learning additional languages. However, students with more severe dyslexia...

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Irish Exemption

Key Points to Note A pupil is not allowed to be exempt from the study of Irish simply because he or she is dyslexic, or because they find the subject difficult. There are very specific criteria that must be met in order to secure an exemption. Once the exemption has been granted it follows the...

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How Teachers Can Help

General Advice Teachers need to be well informed about dyslexia given that on average there will be at least three students in each classroom who have dyslexia. All teachers are responsible for catering for the diverse learning needs of their students. Understanding and empathy will help teachers to make their classroom more inclusive. Dyslexia affects...

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Reading Schools and Units

The special reading schools are full-time national schools for children with significant dyslexia, provided by the Dept. of Education and Skills and so are free of charge. The regular school curriculum is followed, with the exception of Irish. There is a strong focus on literacy attainment. The current pupil-teacher ratio is 9:1 in these classes....

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Accessing College and Further Education

Making the decision to attend further or higher education can be daunting. For individuals with dyslexia they may wonder will they receive the supports they need in order to successfully complete their chosen course. It is a good idea to know your strengths and weaknesses and to choose courses that will provide an opportunity for...

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Reasonable Accommodations in College and Further Education

Educational institutions are required to take reasonable steps to prevent disadvantage that may arise from disability. Most colleges have dedicated units and or staff members who provide specific supports for students with disabilities, often called the Disability Support Service or Access Office. The activities of these services vary from college to college, but they generally...

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Specialist Literacy Tuition

Programmes Multi-sensory literacy programmes are structured, sequential, cumulative, and they build in lots of opportunities for repetition and over-learning. The Orton-Gillingham method was the original multi-sensory programme designed to teach pupils with dyslexia. All good multi-sensory programmes follow similar structures. The following are some commonly used multi-sensory programmes: Alpha to Omega (Hornsby and Shear) The...

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Assistive Technology

Computers, tablets and smartphones, and the software they use, can be extremely useful tools for people with dyslexia They can support key areas of difficulty including reading, spelling and study skills.  Technology can help solve many of the problems faced by people with dyslexia in everyday life, education and employment. The range of technologies available...

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Supports For Young People

Assessment An assessment not only diagnoses the difficulty but also gives a great deal of information about an individual’s learning profile. Once you have been assessed you should ask your parents to explain the results to you and go through your difficulties as well as your strengths. The aim is to help you understand in...

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How Parents Can Help

How Parents can help Parents often ask how best they can help their children once a diagnosis of dyslexia has been given. The following is offered as a result of the experience of many parents over the years: Don’t feel guilty. You did not cause your child to have dyslexia and you could not have...

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Adult Dyslexia

The word dyslexia comes from Greek and means “difficulty with words”. Dyslexia is a specific learning disability (SLD).  It can cause difficulty with reading, spelling and sometimes numbers.  A person with dyslexia can also have difficulty with right and left, sequencing, memory and following instructions. People with dyslexia can also have distinct strengths. They can...

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